Vulnerable Adults Policy

The Point Church Safeguarding and Promoting the Welfare of Vulnerable Adults

March 2013

Adapted from the Diocese of Chichester Policy 2011

Foreword from Bishop John Hind

After some years of learning how best to create a safe environment in the Church for children, young people and those involved with them, the time has come to formalise what is already widely recognised as similar safeguarding for other vulnerable people and their carers. The whole Church is grateful for the efforts of our professional advisers in “building our capacity” to make sure that, as far as we are able, the Church is in the lead in having both the policies and the practices that enable everyone to reach their full potential as human beings made in the image and likeness of God.

This document is intended as a guide, and in some aspects as directions, for parishes and other groups in the Diocese of Chichester as they seek to embody our existing good practice in relation to children also to vulnerable adults. I commend this text to you and expect all in the Diocese to adhere strictly to the best practice it embodies. It is not mere advice but a statement of what as a community we believe and practise.

Introduction

Sections:

Policy
Policy – General statements of intent and underlying principles P1. Principles of the House of Bishops’ policy
P2. Policy Statement
P3. Our theological approach

Procedures
Administrative routines and other directives which must be followed to comply with a minimum of safe practice

G1. Implementing a policy in a parish or network church G2.What is Abuse?
G3. Vulnerability
G4.What is mistreatment, abuse or harm?

G5. Different forms of abuse
G6. Reporting mistreatment
G7. Recording
G8. Concern or allegation
G9. Diocesan Procedure
G10. Allegations against church workers
G11. Action following a referral about a person in a position of trust G12. Suspension

G13. Pastoral support
G14. Communications with the media
G15. Record keeping
G16. Duty of care – insurance advice
G17. Matters to consider following an investigation
G18. Allegations of Previous Abuse
G19. Confidentiality
G20. Procedures for the safe recruitment of paid employees and volunteers G21. Diocesan appointments
G22. General information
G23. Making an appointment
G24. Definition of a vulnerable adult
G25. Your church and the Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS)
G26. Training requirements

Recommended Practice

Advice to create a safe environment for vulnerable adults. This advice should be followed as closely as possible. Changes to this section should only be made after seeking the advice of the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser. All workers with vulnerable adults should have access to this section

Y1. Guidance for those in positions of trust or exercising pastoral ministry with vulnerable people
Y2. Pastoral relationships
Y3. Financial integrity

Y4. Conversations and interviews in a ministry context
Y5. Guidelines for use of photographic or other imaging equipment.

Information
Background material which may be of interest

B1 Categories and Indicators of Abuse
B2 Predisposing Factors Which May Lead to Abuse

Appendices

  1. A model Policy on the Safeguarding of Adults in the Church
  2. Information and application form for all paid and voluntary workers withvulnerable adults
  3. Confidential Declaration with Respect to Work with Vulnerable Adults
  4. Sample of Letter to be sent to referees
  5. Sample reply form for referees
  6. SAMPLE Job role for volunteers / workers with Vulnerable Adults
  7. Consent form to use of images
  8. Useful contact numbers
  9. Resources for people who may be vulnerable

All relevant information for the safeguarding of vulnerable adults can also be found on the Diocesan web site:-

  • ·  The House of Bishops’ Policy – Promoting a Safe Church
  • ·  The Diocesan policy and procedures & practice guidance – Safeguarding andPromoting the Welfare of Vulnerable Adults (2010)
  • ·  Recruitment and Criminal Records Bureau procedures and advice atwww.diochi.org.uk

The procedures and recommended good practice contained in this document are issued on the authority of the Bishop of the Diocese, and are to be used by the cathedral, parishes and all organisations, which are under the auspices of the Diocese. Careful implementation of this policy and clear communication of its elements to the congregation, including vulnerable adults and their carers, will play a vital role in the Diocese of Chichester’s commitment to safeguard vulnerable adults. It will help to ensure that vulnerable adults can participate fully in the wide range of pastoral, social and other general activities in an environment in which they will be safe from harm and abuse. This is the responsibility of the whole church community and is in accordance with House of Bishops’ National Policy on Safeguarding Adults.

Introduction

An increase in awareness of the needs of vulnerable adults should enable Christians to recognise and speak out about harm wherever it is encountered and to take positive steps to prevent abuse and promote well being. Everyone responsible for congregations and organisations in the Diocese should make themselves familiar with and implement the House of Bishops’ policy document “Promoting a Safe Church 2006” and this accompanying Diocesan Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Document “Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults 2010”. This document is based on the relevant legislation “Care Standards Act 2000 and Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 1989/2004” and government guidance contained in Safeguarding Adults : a national framework of Standards and Good Practice in Adult Protection 2005 It complies with the Sussex Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Safeguarding Procedures.

This policy document provides a safe framework within which church workers can conduct their important ministry to vulnerable adults. All church legal bodies, usually the parish, have a duty of care towards all those to whom they minister. National and Diocesan procedures and good practice guidelines should be followed to ensure that insurance cover is Maintained.

POLICY
General statements of principle and intent

P1. Principles of the House of Bishops’ policy

Christian communities should be places where all people feel welcomed, respected and safe from abuse. The Church is particularly called by God to support those at the margins, those less powerful and those without a voice in our society. The Church can work towards creating a safe and non-discriminatory environment by being aware of some of the particular situations that create vulnerability. Issues which need to be considered include both the physical environment and the attitudes of workers. A person who might be considered vulnerable has the right to:

  • ·  Be treated with respect and dignity;
  • ·  Have their privacy respected;
  • ·  Be able to lead as independent a life as possible;
  • ·  Be able to choose how to lead their life;
  • ·  Have the protection of the law;
  • ·  Have their rights upheld regardless of their ethnicity, gender, sexuality,impairment or disability, age, religion or cultural background;
  • ·  Be able to use their chosen language or method of communication;
  • ·  Be heard.P2. Policy Statement

    The Church of England is committed to encouraging an environment where all people and especially those who may be vulnerable for any reason are able to worship and pursue their faith journey with encouragement and in safety. Everyone, whether they see themselves as vulnerable or not, will receive respectful pastoral ministry recognizing any power imbalance within such a relationship.

    All church workers involved in any pastoral ministry will be recruited with care including the use of the Criminal Records Bureau disclosure service when legal or appropriate. Workers will receive training and continuing support.

    Any allegations of mistreatment, abuse, harassment or bullying will be responded to without delay. Whether or not the matter involves the church there will be cooperation with the police and local authority in any investigation.

    Sensitive and informed pastoral care will be offered to anyone who has suffered abuse, including support to make a complaint if so desired: help to find appropriate specialist care either from the church or secular agencies will be offered.

    Congregations will often include people who have offended in a way that means they are a continuing risk to vulnerable people. The risks will be managed sensitively with the protection of adults and children in mind.

P3. Our theological approach

From beginning (in the cry of a baby) to end (in the cry from the cross), the life and death of Jesus Christ illustrates the willingness of God to be vulnerable in order to share to the full our world of pain, poverty, suffering and death. In his earthly ministry, Jesus constantly showed himself to be compassionately on the side of the outcast, the marginalized and the stranger, reaching across social barriers with the inclusive love of God. This was wholly in line with the Hebrew Bible’s priority concern for orphans and widows, its obligation to provide a voice for the voiceless, and its prophetic call for justice to ‘roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream’ (Amos 5.24). The risen Christ’s commission to his followers (‘As the Father has sent me, so I send you’ [John 20.21]) requires the Christian Church to exercise that same concern for those whom some in society treat as the outsider and the stranger, to reach across barriers of exclusion and demonstrate a love which shows itself in compassionate pastoral care and in the quest for justice in all our relationships. The heart of Christian pastoral care is this: love for God and love for our neighbour, the social expression of which is justice in all human affairs. In line with the gospel of creation and redemption, Christian pastoral care has often been described in terms of healing, sustaining and reconciling.

All people, and especially those who may be marginalized through vulnerability, need to receive the healing love of God to rebuild relationships with others or within themselves which illness, disability or abuse may have fractured. Healing is a process of being made more whole.

There can be substantial steps for some people in this life, which can be aided through the Church’s ministry of healing and reconciliation, though full healing in all dimensions of life must wait for the coming of Christ’s kingdom when all creation will be healed and renewed. For those who have been abused, neighbour love includes the need for them to be listened to and believed, supported as they cope with the effects of trauma, abled to make the choices which will lead to healing and start on the costly road towards forgiveness.

The Christian gospel offers the grace of reconciliation with God, which can enable people to learn to live lives more reconciled with others and with their environment. Everyone needs the sustaining reassurance that they are treated with the respect that is due to all human beings made in the image of God and precious to God.

Those who have challenging personal situations must receive the resources they need to live independent lives with dignity. Everyone needs to know that they can live safely in a non-threatening environment. Christian pastoral care takes place in the context of the present world, which in gospel terms is provisional. We live in the time between God’s living Word to us in Jesus Christ, and the coming of God’s kingdom in its fullness, when there will be no more pain, no more tears, no more social exclusion, and no more death.

In this world the Holy Spirit sustains our ministry – enabling us to do what we can within the constraints of fallenness and sin, and yet holding out the living hope that the day will come when God will be all and in all.

PROCEDURES
G1. Implementing a policy in a parish or network church

Everyone, as a citizen, has a responsibility for the safety, well-being and protection of others. Everyone within the church community also has a responsibility to ensure that there is a welcome for all people, including those seen as vulnerable. A policy about the safeguarding of vulnerable people should be the concern of the whole congregation and therefore should be presented to the Parochial Church Council for adoption and be reaffirmed at least annually.2 This is an opportunity for church members to remember their commitment to one another. Everyone should be alert to situations where those who might be vulnerable are exposed to unacceptable risks.

Those who work with vulnerable people often find themselves in challenging situations and need the support, prayers and encouragement of everyone in the congregation. Sometimes workers may be confronted with difficult behaviour on the part of those with whom they are working; sometimes workers may have to face difficult decisions about incidents that may need to be reported to the statutory authorities.

The congregation and church workers need to be clear about the procedures which should be followed when there are concerns about people being harmed or abused. Those who work most closely with vulnerable people in lunch clubs, day centres, and Bible study groups or as pastoral visitors, etc., are in a unique position to get to know them. As a result workers might learn about things that give cause for concern or they may see others, sometimes including fellow workers or church members, behaving in ways that may be described as abusive or potentially harmful. When visiting a care home, for example, a visitor may observe another resident showing signs of abuse.

Workers should have a good knowledge of the guidelines for good practice and should be implementing them; they should know what to do if they learn of any incidents where vulnerable people are being mistreated or abused.

Not all concerns about the welfare or safety of a vulnerable person need the public authorities to be involved; sometimes it may be that the concern focuses on behaviour and attitudes that are not immediately harmful and then the matter should be dealt with through training or discussion. The choices of the adult concerned should if at all possible be accepted. The response to any concerns should always be proportionate and appropriate to the issue. Parishes or network churches should do their best to provide a safe place for those who may be vulnerable.

Where the parish or network church organizes special activities or groups for vulnerable people, care should be taken to ensure that those who work in these activities are carefully appointed, supported and supervised. Recruitment to other positions of trust should be carried out sensitively but thoroughly to try to prevent inappropriate appointments being made. The Parochial Church Council or Board of Trustees together with the incumbent carries a duty of care for the safety of those who attend or use the church. The Council

should, with the help of the diocese, ensure that a policy is in place that reflects the need to safeguard vulnerable people and that it is being implemented and has appropriate resources. The Council needs to find ways to communicate the policy to the whole congregation. Clergy in particular need to be aware of the pastoral needs of vulnerable people, their carers and those that work with them.

The OT must appoint a named individual (safeguarding coordinator for Vulnerable Adults) to act as the key person to speak on behalf of vulnerable people both within the congregation and to outside bodies. Ideally the appointed person should have some experience in this field.

Such a person may be the most appropriate person to receive information about concerns and will need to listen carefully, possibly discussing the matter with the adult concerned and making a decision about whether these concerns should be passed to an outside statutory body such as the police or the local authority Adult Services. The lead person should always liaise with and seek advice from the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser. It is accepted that some parishes or network churches may find it difficult to appoint someone to undertake this responsibility and the role can be incorporated with the role of the Child Protection Coordinator is that is more practical.

G2. What is Abuse?

“Abuse is a violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by any other person or persons “Abuse may consist of a single act or repeated acts. It may be physical, verbal or psychological, it may be an act of neglect or an omission to act, or it may occur when a vulnerable person is persuaded to enter into a financial or sexual transaction to which he or she has not consented, or cannot consent. Abuse can occur in any relationship and may result in significant harm to, or exploitation of, the person subjected to it.” (No Secrets, Department of Health 2000)

G3. Vulnerability

Human beings are, by their very nature, subject to the chances and changes of this world. Each one has strengths and weaknesses, capacities and restrictions. At some time everyone will be vulnerable to a wide range of pressures, concerns or dangers. No one is invulnerable; some people may consider themselves to be strong but, when circumstances change, strengths can quickly disappear. Some people by reason of their physical or social circumstances have higher levels of vulnerability than others. It is the Christian duty of everyone to recognize and support those who are identified as being more vulnerable. In supporting a vulnerable person we must do so with compassion and in a way that maintains dignity.

In order to bring into focus those people for whom the Church should have a particular care this working definition may be helpful:

A vulnerable adult is defined (by the Law Commission) as a person over 18 years, who is or maybe in need of community care services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness; and who is unable to take care of him or herself against significant harm or exploitation.

They may include:

  • ·  People with a mental health problem or mental illness (including dementia)
  • ·  People with a physical disability
  • ·  People with a sensory impairment
  • ·  People with a learning disability
  • ·  People who are frail and/or experiencing a temporary illness. OTECTIVELYMARKED

    G4. What is mistreatment, abuse or harm?

    Mistreatment is defined in No Secrets as ‘a violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by any other person or persons’. It is any misuse of a pastoral or managerial relationship, from the most serious to less severe behaviour, which lies at its root. Mistreatment covers abuse, bullying and harassment. These categories are not watertight and can merge into one another. Harm is what results from mistreatment or abuse.

    Abuse may be perpetrated by an individual or a group. It may be accepted or exacerbated by the culture of an institution, in which case it is described as institutional abuse. Abuse concerns the misuse of power where control and/or authority can manifest as a criminal offence.

    Harassment, bullying and exploitation, discrimination and oppression are other types of behaviour which are not acceptable within church ministry.

    Abuse can take place in the person’s home, day centre, family home, community setting and in public places (including churches and ancillary buildings). The list is endless.

    Anyone can potentially be an abuser, for example:

  • ·  Carers or volunteers
  • ·  Health workers, social workers or any other professional person
  • ·  Relatives, friends or neighbours
  • ·  Another vulnerable adult
  • ·  A visitor or someone providing any kind of service
  • ·  Someone who deliberately exploits vulnerable and/or older peopleDomestic abuse is widespread in our society and the Church needs to respond supportively to those experiencing such abuse. See the Church of England’s report responding to domestic abuse (2006).

    A carer might be being physically or emotionally harmed by the person they are looking after.

    All those who work in regular, face-to-face contact or have responsibilities for adults or are in positions of trust should be aware of the potential for the misuse and abuse of power.

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Training in good practice and awareness of adult abuse and the proper recruitment of those who work in any recognized ministry on behalf of the Church is therefore essential.

The possibility of vulnerable people being harmed is not confined to their lives outside of the Church. Church workers need to be vigilant to protect vulnerable people from harm whilst they are attending worship or other meetings or activities or being visited by someone from the congregation.

There is a specific range of issues that need to be addressed about church buildings, to ensure they are safe and accessible. In addition the Church has a responsibility and duty of care to ensure that all those who are closely involved with vulnerable people are behaving in safe and appropriate ways.

Of course many people will be good friends of people who have impairments – it is not appropriate to try to ‘legislate’ their friendship, only their responsibilities when acting on behalf of the Church. All church workers have a responsibility to treat all those they minister to with respect.

G5. Different forms of abuse

  • ·  Physical: such as hitting, pushing, locking someone in a room;
  • ·  Verbal: abuse such as shouting and/or swearing;
  • ·  Emotional: such as bullying, taunting or humiliating someone;
  • ·  Financial: such as misusing, withholding or taking someone’s money; abuse ofa position to make people offer gifts, leave legacies or change a will;
  • ·  Neglect: such as not providing necessary food, care or medicine;
  • ·  Sexual: such as inappropriate touching, forcing someone to take part in anysexual act against their will;
  • ·  Discrimination: such as ill treatment due to the person’s age, gender, disability,religious beliefs or race which may include harassment;
  • ·  Institutional: such as lack of individual care, no flexibility of bedtimes orwaking, deprived environment and lack of stimulation;
  • ·  Spiritual: such as attempts to ‘force’ religious views or values onto people,intrusive healing and deliverance ministries which result in people experiencing physical, emotional or sexual harm.

    Any or all of these types of abuse may be perpetrated as the result or deliberate intent and targeting of vulnerable people, negligence or ignorance.

    G6. Reporting mistreatment

    Many clergy and lay people will visit vulnerable people. If they suspect that someone is being mistreated in some way, they should always take responsibility for doing something about their concerns.

    If someone tells you about abuse or you have concerns your role is to respond sensitively and pass the information on to the Diocesan Safeguarding Vulnerable adults Adviser or directly to social services or to the police.

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Disclosure may take place many years after a traumatic event or when someone has left a setting in which they were afraid. This delay should not, in itself, cast doubt on its truthfulness.

Remember many vulnerable people rely on their carers for support, shelter and care and therefore the reporting of mistreatment needs to be undertaken with sensitivity.

If a vulnerable adult discloses abuse

Do

  • ·  Stay calm – Remember that this is an important conversation with someone who may be more anxious than you are
  • ·  Make sure that the vulnerable person is safe from immediate risk
  • ·  Listen positively to what they are saying and take it seriously
  • ·  Accept what is being said (this is not the same as deciding whether the allegation istrue or not – others will address this later)
  • ·  Avoid leading the person and keep any questions to the absolute minimum. Ask onlywhat is necessary to ensure a clear understanding of what has been said. This is particularly important when dealing with vulnerable people who may succumb to suggestive questioning.
  • ·  Be aware of interpreting what the person is saying, especially if they have learning or physical disabilities which affect their ability to communicate or English is not their first language. An independent interpreter should be used if there is any kind of communication challenge.
  • ·  Be aware of the possibility that medical evidence might be needed
  • ·  Discuss and negotiate with the Vulnerable Adult what you will do next and why
  • ·  Ascertain the wishes of the alleged victim/witness about what they want to do orhappen
  • ·  Explain boundaries of confidentiality i.e. that you have a duty of care to reportmatters of alleged abuse and information will be shared only on a needs to know

    basis

  • ·  If it is a matter that you must report, inform them that you are duty bound to do so
  • ·  Report to the Diocesan Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Adviser or to social servicesor the police
  • ·  Write down what was said by the person disclosing as soon as possible.

Remember

  • ·  You must not attempt to deal with the problem alone.
  • ·  The primary responsibility of the person who first suspects or is told of abuseis to report it and to ensure that their concern is taken seriously.
  • ·  Under no circumstances should anything be done that might be construed asan investigation of the allegation, as action of this nature may contaminate evidence should a formal investigation by either the police or local authority be instigated.
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Do Not

  • ·  In the first instance the allegation should be reported to the Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Coordinator and or incumbent who will consult with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser.
  • ·  Anyone has the right to contact Social Services but the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser must be informed and is always available for consultation.
  • ·  If necessary he/she will liaise with Social Services on your behalf.
  • ·  Failure to observe these guidelines may leave a vulnerable adult unprotectedagainst further abuse.
  • ·  Press the person for more details; this will be done at a later date.
  • ·  Stop someone who is freely recalling significant events; (for example, don’tsay ‘Hold on we’ll come back to that later,’ as they may not tell you again.
  • ·  Be judgmental or voice your own opinion
  • ·  Do not promise to keep secrets; you cannot keep this kind of informationconfidential
  • ·  Contact the alleged abuser
  • ·  Pass on the information to anyone other than those with a legitimate’ needto know,’ such as the Safeguarding Adults Adviser, Incumbent and Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser

G7. Recording
At the first opportunity make a note of the disclosure and date and sign your record. You should aim to:

  • ·  Note what the people actually said, using their own words and phrases
  • ·  Describe the circumstances in which the disclosure came about
  • ·  Note the setting and anyone else who was there at the time
  • ·  Separate out factual information from your own opinions
  • ·  Use a pen or biro with black ink, so that the report can be photocopied
  • ·  Be aware that your report may be required later as part of a legal action ordisciplinary procedure

    G8 Concern or allegation

  • ·  Where a concern exists that a vulnerable adult may be being abused, may have been abused or be at risk of abuse, such a concern must initially be treated in the same way as an allegation
  • ·  Refer the concern to the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser promptly so that further action may be considered. If a vulnerable adult is at immediate risk, a referral must be made to the police or Adult Services and then the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser should be informed
  • ·  Do not alert the alleged abuser, either directly or indirectly
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· When a referral is made to the police or Adult Services by a person other than the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser, all information must be passed to the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser by the end of the next working day and followed up in writing.

G9. Diocesan Procedure

Any report of abuse will be taken seriously and looked into in a fair and thorough manner by all parties. Working with other organisations, the Adult Services department of the Local

Authority may

· · · · · ·

have a coordinating role which might involve:

Talking to you and other people involved to find out what has happened; Carry out an investigation;
Planning what to do to protect the person being abused
Supporting the person and their carers through the process;

Closely monitoring the situation in the future
Separate support will be offered to both victim and abuser. It is recommended that the Incumbent should co-ordinate rather than provide the support to either party.

If a crime is suspected the Police will carry out an investigation, working alongside other agencies

G10. Allegations against church workers

Church workers themselves may be suspected of mistreatment of an adult or another worker. Workers may not be following a code of conduct for church workers. If the abuse of adult appears to be a criminal offence the police must be informed and a referral must be made to the local authority. In these circumstances or if a worker has failed to follow an agreed code of conduct consideration should be given to suspension during an investigation. With less serious matters such as inappropriate behaviour or attitudes the worker’s superior should approach the worker with the aim of identifying ways of improving the situation. The worker should be informed that disciplinary proceedings might be brought if there is no improvement.

People suffering from mistreatment may wish to make a complaint. A possible complaints procedure is provided in Procedure 4 of the House of Bishops’ policy “Promoting a Safe Church”.

G11. Action following a referral about a person in a position of trust

Once a concern has been identified that a vulnerable adult may have been harmed by a member of the Church community and a referral made to the statutory authorities, it is important to liaise closely with them during any investigation. This is always a difficult Ti me and needs to be carefully managed. It is the responsibility of the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser to co-ordinate the Diocesan response, attend strategy meetings with the other

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agencies and interested parties and work with them during the investigation. The incumbent, or the Archdeacon in the case of clergy referrals, will be responsible in consultation with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser for the coordination of support in the parish or network church.

The highest degree of confidentiality should be maintained and only the people who need to know should be informed of the circumstances. The Diocesan Director for communications should manage all media relations.

G12. Suspension

In all circumstances where an allegation is made relating to beneficed or licensed clergy, licensed, or accredited lay-workers, paid lay staff or volunteers, consideration must be given to whether a person should be suspended from their duties whilst the statutory agencies undertake any investigation. Suspension should be seen as a neutral act.

Suspension allows for an individual to stand down or stand aside while matters of concern are considered. The suspension is primarily for the protection of children and vulnerable adults but the needs of the person themselves and their family should also be considered particularly in the light of media attention. In order to decide whether or not to suspend the person, the Bishop (or employer or manager) should seek legal advice and consult with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser who will have taken advice from the statutory agencies involved in the multi-agency strategy meeting. This advice will assist in determining whether it is possible and appropriate to suspend the person temporarily or ask them to take leave of absence or have their duties curtailed to prevent contact with children. Decisions should always err on the side of caution. Any information provided to the individual regarding the reasons for suspension must not prejudice any subsequent investigation. A person should always be suspended if he or she is charged with a criminal offence against a child or vulnerable adult.

G13. Pastoral support

During the investigation the vulnerable adult will need support. Another person will need to support the alleged offender. People involved in support should be uninvolved with the investigation or disciplinary proceedings and may be chosen from outside the diocese to ensure neutrality. The Police advise that it is important that these parties should not communicate with each other about the allegation so that evidence is not contaminated. In the case of allegations against a priest the Archdeacon will need to manage the impact of the investigation on the parish or network church.

G14. Communications with the media

In the event of an incident all communications both within and outside the Diocese must be handled by the Diocesan Director for Communications who will consult with the Bishop and the relevant Archdeacon, the Paris/Network Church and the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser. Particular care should be given regarding any public statements or public prayer, which

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should be agreed with the Bishop. Statements for possible media use will normally be agreed at a multi-agency strategy meeting.

G15. Record keeping

It is recognized that people may not make a complaint about abuse until many years after the event. It is therefore important in all circumstances where it has been considered that abuse might have taken place to make careful, factual records. It is recommended that records containing issues of child or adult abuse should be held for a minimum of 50 years. The people involved in such records should be informed that a record is being kept and if possible all parties should agree the record.

G16. Duty of care – insurance advice

All church legal bodies, usually the parish, have a duty of care towards those to whom they minister. National and diocesan good practice guidelines and the procedures in this document should be followed to ensure that insurance cover is maintained. The insurers should be contacted as soon as it is clear that a claim may be made against a diocese/ parish or network church.

G17. Matters to consider following an investigation

An investigation into harm of an adult may result in a criminal conviction, disciplinary penalties, dismissal or resignation from a voluntary or paid position. Support of all concerned will need to be continued throughout the incident. Sometimes in less serious cases the person concerned will need appropriate training and extra supervision in order to be able to continue in their position.

Any abuse within the Church also creates second-order victims, those who experience a betrayal of the trust they have placed in those holding office of any kind. Members of congregations can, for example, feel let down and hurt when one of their leaders offends. Special care is required when a congregation is recovering from the effects of disclosure of abuse.

The Independent Safeguarding Authority

There is now a now a new duty to make referrals to the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) providing details of individuals who have harmed or put at risk of harm children or vulnerable adults in their care.

The duty to refer is triggered by two considerations:

· An employee or volunteer appointed by the OT or another body in the church, such as the Diocese or Cathedral has been removed from their role in working with children or vulnerable adults or that person resigns, retires, is made redundant or transfers to other activity and

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· The OT or other body in the Church thinks (on the balance of probabilities that it is the case) the incident occurred.

This duty is unlikely to arise very often but it is important when it does occur, because failure to comply may be a criminal offence. Your Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser (DSA) will advise and assist you if this duty appears to be arising.

Great care will need to be taken if a person convicted of any relevant offence wishes to be employed or redeployed in a position working with the vulnerable, either adults or children. They may be barred from working with vulnerable people. Even if not barred it will only be in extremely exceptional circumstances, and following a professional risk assessment, that a person who has a conviction or caution for harming a child or a vulnerable adult in a non- sexual manner should be allowed to work or be a volunteer where there is the opportunity for contact with children and or vulnerable adults.

A person convicted or cautioned for any sexual offences against children or vulnerable adults should not again work with, or be a volunteer, where he or she could come into contact with children and or vulnerable adults. An agreement should be drawn up to define the relationship between the convicted person and the church community. For people involved in pastoral or other authorised ministry, whether ordained or not, it may not be possible to provide the level of supervision required even if a particular post does not involve specific contact with children or vulnerable adults. People engaged in such a representational ministry are regarded as trustworthy and as people of integrity, and this perception can be (and has been) used by offenders to target victims. Rehabilitation to any kind of representational ministry should be approached with extreme caution, should follow a professional risk assessment and treatment programme and should be with the agreement of the local safeguarding agencies.

G18. Allegations of Previous Abuse

Allegations of abuse may be made some time after the event (e.g. by an adult who was abused as a child or about a member of staff who is still currently working with vulnerable adults). Where such an allegation is made, staff and volunteers should follow the procedures as detailed above and report the matter to the Social Services or the police.

G19. Confidentiality

Every effort must make to ensure that confidentiality is maintained for all concerned. Information should be handled and shared on a need to know basis only. Confidentiality is not absolute and may be overridden where there is evidence that sharing information is necessary in exceptional cases:

To prevent:

  • ·  Serious crime
  • ·  Danger to a person’s life
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  • ·  Danger to others
  • ·  Danger to the community
  • ·  Danger to the health of the personThe written record of the concerns will be retained in locked safe storage managed under the Data Protection and Confidentiality Policies.

    G20. Procedures for the safe recruitment of paid employees and volunteers.

    Guidance from the Criminal Records Bureau and the Independent Safeguarding Authority tells us to treat all volunteers as if they were employees for the purpose of recruitment.

    G21. Diocesan appointments

    The appointment of clergy, readers and laypeople holding the Bishop’s licence will be administered by either the Bishops’ Offices or the Diocesan Office and are not the responsibility of the parish or network church. Guidance on safe recruiting for these posts is held in these offices.

    G22. General information

    Parishes or network churches should do their best to provide a safe place for those who may be vulnerable. Where the parish or network church organizes special activities or groups for vulnerable people, care should be taken to ensure that those who work in these activities are carefully appointed, supported and supervised.

    Recruitment to other positions of trust should be carried out sensitively but thoroughly to try to prevent inappropriate appointments being made. Safer recruitment means careful selection but also training and supervision of both staff and volunteers. Vetting procedures and safer recruitment guidance are set out in detail in the Church of England companion guidance document Safeguarding Guidance for Safer Recruitment. The relevant vetting and barring scheme for the Diocese of Chichester and the Church of England is that provided by the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) The suitability of an applicant or nominated volunteer for work with children or vulnerable adults should not be solely dependent upon vetting checks and CRB disclosures. Someone whose CRB disclosure is clear may still be unsuitable and the other safer recruitment processes must always also be used.

    The OT should agree how new employees and volunteers will be recruited and appointed, and who will be involved in the process. It should be agreed who will be responsible for taking up references, seeking a confidential declaration and checking the identity of applicants for CRB disclosures. These tasks can be completed by different people.

    Leaders of groups should inform the person managing recruitment of new employees or volunteers at an early stage so that these procedures are followed. New staff and volunteers must complete the recruitment process before starting work.

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It is advised that normally people should be part of the parish or network church for at least 6 months before being asked to help with work with vulnerable adults. People who help in groups less than once a month should be treated as “visitors”. They should be supported and supervised by an officially appointed helper. Young people between 14-18 may help with groups but should be supervised and supported by an adult helper who will be responsible for ensuring that good practice and the safeguarding procedures are followed. People such as vergers, caretakers and mini-bus drivers may have regular contact with vulnerable adults need to be part of these procedures.

G23. Making an appointment

For any position, decide on a job description, which will include a statement of the tasks and responsibilities and to whom the person will be accountable.6 Decide whether or not any new appointment requires a disclosure from the CRB (See the Diocesan website page for up- to-date information). For CRB disclosures l there must be an expectation that the role will include regular contact with vulnerable adults, complying with the definition below. Ask applicants to fill in the Parish or network church application form which includes information about the policies required by the CRB/ISA. These policies should be made available to the applicant on request

Seek two references including at least one that can comment on a person’s suitability to work with vulnerable adults. If possible, ensure that one reference is from outside the present congregation. Obtain a further reference from the incumbent of any previous church. A pro-forma letter is provided

Ask each applicant to complete a confidential declaration form. This gives them the opportunity to declare any convictions or allegations at an early stage. It should be made clear to the applicant to whom the form should be returned and who will see any confidential information it contains. Information contained on a declaration should be discussed with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser. The manager of the recruitment procedure should be informed when a satisfactory confidential declaration has been obtained.

Interview the candidates. For volunteers the interview can be informal and conducted in a relaxed and inclusive manner. Nevertheless it should be focussed and cover the following areas:

a) Relevant knowledge and experience
b) Attitude and aptitude
c) Sensitivity and behaviour towards others
d) Awareness and understanding of safeguards in working with vulnerable adults

Fulfil the CRB clearance and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) vetting when in place.

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The Standard level CRB Disclosure is no longer available for those working with children and/or vulnerable adults. All those eligible for a Disclosure within the Church will be checked at Enhanced level only.

It is important that once all the checks have been completed and the person has been appointed that follow up action is taken:

  • ·  New volunteers are made aware and asked to adhere to the Diocesan safeguarding adults policy
  • ·  Training needs are established and actioned
  • ·  The roles and responsibilities of the new volunteer are signed up to.
  • ·  A period of supervision/observation or mentoring is used to support the newvolunteer.

    G24. The definition of a Vulnerable Adult

    A vulnerable adult is a person who is aged 18 years or older and:

  • ·  is living in residential accommodation, such as a care home or a residential special school;
  • ·  is living in sheltered housing;
  • ·  is receiving domiciliary care in his or her own home;
  • ·  is receiving any form of health care;
  • ·  is detained in a prison, remand centre, young offender institution, securetraining centre or attendance centre or under the powers of the Immigration

    and Asylum Act 1999;

  • ·  is in contact with probation services;
  • ·  is receiving a welfare service of a description to be prescribed in regulations;
  • ·  is receiving a service or participating in an activity which is specificallytargeted at people with age-related needs, disabilities or prescribed physical or mental health conditions or expectant or nursing mothers living in residential care (age-related needs includes needs associated with frailty, illness, disability or mental capacity);
  • ·  is receiving direct payments from a local authority/HSS body in lieu of social care services;
  • ·  requires assistance in the conduct of his or her own affairsThe definition is context based – i.e. a person is classified as vulnerable when they are receiving the specified services, but not necessarily in other contexts. So someone who is (for example) receiving health care will be classified as a vulnerable adult when they are visiting their GP or hospital, but not when they are shopping or worshipping at church.

    N.B. These definitions are narrower than the definitions of vulnerable adults than in the House of Bishops’ policy for safeguarding adults Promoting a Safe Church. The House of Bishops policy still stands in relation to the wider definition of vulnerability which it sets out.

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G25. Your church and the Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS) Elements in place October 2010
ISA and recruitment

From November 2010 employers must check whether an individual is barred under the ISA registration scheme. This will determine whether they can be appointed and may affect the type of activities they can undertake. This information is made available on the CRB disclosure.

If an individual is on the barred list they may still be able to take part in some activities and a risk assessment will need to be undertaken to ascertain what activities they can undertake. Careful consideration needs to be given as to who conducts the risk assessment and where the accountability lies.

If there is a concern or allegation about an employee or volunteer contact the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser as to how to proceed, as this may involve reporting the person to the ISA. It is also likely to require consulting the LADO (Local Authority Designated Officer) before taking action. (For further details about managing concerns or allegations, please refer to Protecting All God’s Children, (4th edition, October 2010)).

It is important that those with the responsibility for the appointment of volunteers and where, relevant employees in the Church understand the new requirements.

Who needs to apply for a CRB Disclosure?

Those who regularly care for, train, supervise, transport, advise or are in sole charge of vulnerable people as described by the above definition are the only ones who should obtain a CRB Enhanced Disclosure. Many people who work with adults will not be able to be checked.

Careful attention needs to be paid to this guidance, since it is an offence to demand a CRB check or insist on Registration.

Holders of the certainly need

·

· · · ·

following church-related roles are therefore among those who will almost to be CRB-checked :

All clergy (stipendiary and non-stipendiary, including all chaplains and retired clergy with a licence), Readers and Licensed Evangelists.
Pastoral Assistants, where the role specifies relevant work;
Commissioned and Non-Commissioned Lay Workers, including lay ministers: Parish or network church Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Co-ordinators Leaders, Assistants and Drivers for OT-approved luncheon clubs or other community activities that are wholly or mainly for vulnerable adults. [An

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assessment of whether this activity is solely or mainly for vulnerable adults as

defined above will need to be made.]
· OT-approved Home Visitors for schemes that are wholly or mainly for

vulnerable adults. Private arrangements (where people visit one another as friends rather than as part of a formal visiting scheme) are excluded.

The activity does not need to be with the same vulnerable adult for frequent, intensive and overnight to apply. For example, someone who visits vulnerable adults in a respite centre once a week may not have contact with the same vulnerable adults but they are still engaging in the activity frequently and must register with the ISA.

The statements above are not exhaustive, and there will be posts where a parish, network church or diocese needs to consider carefully the role descriptions against the VBS eligibility criteria. If you are unsure about whether groups you work with fit the definition of ‘vulnerable adults’, or if you are in doubt about where a role fits, contact your Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser.

G26. Training requirements

  • ·  All clergy joining the Diocese must attend a diocesan safeguarding seminar
  • ·  They should attend a refresher training every three years
  • ·  All readers must attend a training seminar after each appointment
  • ·  All Parish or network church Safeguarding Adults Coordinators must attend aDiocesan Safeguarding Adults seminar on appointment and a refresher

    training every three years

  • ·  All paid workers with vulnerable adults must attend a Diocesan childprotection training seminar on appointment and a refresher training every

    three years

  • ·  All other people working with vulnerable adults must attend training everyfive years. This can be arranged through the parish or by the Diocesan

    Safeguarding Adviser

  • ·  Refresher training can be a repeat of the initial seminar or other specialisttraining or relevant conferences. A record should be kept of all training undertaken.
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BEST PRACTICE

Y1 Guidance for those in positions of trust or exercising pastoral ministry with vulnerable people

The Convocations of York and Canterbury have produced Guidelines for the Professional Conduct of the Clergy. All those involved in pastoral ministry in the Diocese, whether paid or unpaid, clergy or lay, should be working within this set of guidelines. Following such guidelines should not only protect vulnerable people but also ensure that workers are not wrongly accused of abuse or misconduct.

Y2. Pastoral relationships

Workers in pastoral ministry need to develop an understanding of themselves and how they relate to others. They need to ensure their own safety whilst increasing the wellbeing and safety of others. People in positions of trust necessarily have power, although this may not be apparent to them, therefore respecting professional boundaries is particularly important. Many pastoral relationships can become intertwined with friendships and social contacts, making this guidance even more necessary.

  • ·  Church workers should exercise particular care when ministering to persons with whom they have a close personal friendship or family relationship.
  • ·  Church workers should be aware of the dangers of dependency in pastoraland professional relationships and seek advice or supervision when these

    concerns arise.

  • ·  Church workers who exercise a healing ministry should be trained in thetheology and non-intrusive practice of that work.
  • ·  Church workers should recognize their limits and not undertake any ministrythat is beyond their competence or role (e.g. therapeutic counselling, deliverance ministry, counselling victims of abuse and domestic violence, or their perpetrators, or giving legal advice). In such instances the person should be referred to another person or agency with appropriate expertise.
  • ·  Church workers should avoid behaviour that could give the impression of inappropriate favouritism or the encouragement of inappropriate special relationships.
  • ·  Church workers should treat those with whom they minister or visit with respect, encouraging self-determination, independence and choice.
  • ·  Care should be taken when helping with physical needs, washing and toileting, always respecting the choices of the individual concerned.
  • ·  Pastoral relationships may develop into romantic attachments and such situations should be handled sensitively. Workers need to recognize such a development and make it clear to both the person concerned and a supervisor or colleague.
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Alternative arrangements should be made for the ongoing pastoral care of the person concerned.

  • ·  Church workers should not undertake any pastoral ministry while they are under the influence of drink or non-prescribed drugs.
  • ·  Workers should be aware of the power imbalance inherent in pastoral relationships. It is never appropriate for workers to take advantage of their role and engage in sexual activity with anyone with whom they have a pastoral relationship.
  • ·  Church workers must take responsibility for their words and actions if wishing to make physical contact with another adult (e.g. a hug may be misunderstood) or talk to them about sexual matters. This will include seeking permission, respecting the person’s wishes, noticing and responding to non-verbal communication, refraining from such conduct if in doubt about the person’s wishes.
  • ·  Church workers should refrain from viewing, possessing or distributing sexually exploitative images of adults.
  • ·  Church workers should avoid situations where they feel vulnerable to temptation or where their conduct may be misinterpreted.Y3. Financial integrity

    Financial dealings can have an impact on the church and the community and must always be handled with integrity. Those with authority for such matters should maintain proper systems and not delegate that responsibility to anyone else.

  • ·  Church workers should not seek personal financial gain from their position beyond their salary or recognized allowances.
  • ·  Church workers should not be influenced by offers of money.
  • ·  Church workers should ensure that church and personal finances are keptapart and should avoid any conflict of interest.
  • ·  Money received by the church should be handled by two unrelated laypeople.
  • ·  Any gifts received should be disclosed to a supervisor or colleague where itshould be decided whether they could be accepted.
  • ·  Care should be taken not to canvass for church donations from those whomay be vulnerable, e.g. the recently bereaved.

    Y4. Conversations and interviews in a ministry context

    Formal interviews and informal conversations in a ministry context are pastoral encounters. Church workers should be aware of their language and behaviour. For example, innuendoes or compliments of a sexual nature are always inappropriate. When a person asks questions or seeks advice around topics of a sexual nature, the worker should be discerning about the motives and needs of the person and question their own ability to assist.

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The church worker should consider in advance:

  • ·  The place of the meeting, arrangement of the furniture and lighting, the worker’s dress;
  • ·  The balance of privacy for conversation with the opportunity for supervision (open doors or windows in doors, another person nearby);
  • ·  The physical distance between people determined by hospitality and respect, being aware that someone may have suffered abuse or harassment in the past;
  • ·  Whether the circumstances suggest a professional or social interaction;
  • ·  The propriety or danger of visiting or being visited alone, especially in theevening;
  • ·  The personal safety and comfort of all participants;
  • ·  Establishing at the outset the nature of the interview in respect to subjectmatter, confidentiality and duration;
  • ·  The appropriateness of initiating or receiving any physical contact, forexample gestures of comfort, which may be unwanted or misinterpreted.

    Y5. Guidelines for use of photographic or other imaging equipment.

    The taking of photographs, film or other images of vulnerable adults is not appropriate without consent. Workers must ensure that such consent is in place before making any such image of a vulnerable adult.

    When such images are properly obtained then they must be used only for the purpose consented to. Special care must be taken, when using any image in general publicity or in publications such as annual reports or press promotions. All images must maintain the dignity of the individual.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION B1 Categories and Indicators of Abuse

Adult Abuse can be viewed in terms of a number of key categories which are described below and which mirror the categories in ‘In Safe Hands’. It is not unusual for an individual to be abused in more than one way and to fit into more than one category. Abuse can occur in a wide range of community and care settings including care homes, day centres, the person’s own home or the home of a relative, worker or volunteer.

Physical Abuse

Physical abuse can be caused either through acts of commission (action) or omission (inaction) including hitting, slapping, pushing, kicking, over or misuse of medication, undue restraint or inappropriate sanctions.

a) Bodily Assaults

Infliction of pain;
Injury such as burns, bruises, fractures, dislocation of joints, welts, wounds, Marks of unnecessary physical restraints.

b) Bodily Impairment

Malnutrition including inappropriate diet and dehydration; Poor hygiene;
Misuse of alcohol;
Sleep deprivation;

Improper ventilation (temperature); Creating unsafe physical environment.

Possible Indicators

History of unexplained falls or minor injuries;
Bruising;
Bruising on normally well protected areas e.g. inside thigh or inside upper arms;
Finger marks – grip or poking;
Burns in unusual places or of an unusual type;
Evidence of physical restraint, e.g. arms or legs tied to bed frame;
Injuries / bruising found at different stages of healing that would suggest a non accidental cause;
Injury shape similar to an object;
Injuries to head, face or scalp;
Pressure sores and being left in wet clothing;
Hypothermia;
Dehydration and / or malnourished without an illness related cause or when not living alone;
Vulnerable person is often unkempt, unwashed, smelly.

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c) Misuse or Restriction of Medication

The consequence of receiving medication improperly i.e. being refused medication, receiving too much or too little medication. Medical care may be made unavailable or be inappropriately provided when needed.

Using medication that has been prescribed for another person or for another purpose.

Using medication for the purpose of confinement and restraint or primarily for the convenience of staff or carers.

Possible Indicator

Excessive request for repeat prescriptions by carer or under use of medication.

Sexual Abuse

(a) Intentional Sexual Abuse

Involving the vulnerable adult in such acts as rape, actual or threatened or sexual assault, or sexual acts to which the vulnerable adult has not or could not consent and/or was pressurised into consenting.

(b) Denial of Rights

This includes denial of sexual expression or fulfilling sexual needs within the accepted norms of society.

Possible Indicators

Sexual behaviour which is out of keeping with the vulnerable adult’s usual relationship or level of sexual knowledge;
The vulnerable adult behaves in a substantially different manner and inappropriately in the presence of certain persons, e.g. exhibiting sexually implicit / explicit behaviour, etc, Unexplained change in behaviour, e.g. showing overly compliant behaviour, self mutilation, acting out aggressive behaviour, or becoming withdrawn, choosing to spend the majority of time alone;

Physical signs and symptoms such as recurrent genital infections or soreness, bruises or bleeding in the genital or anal area, unexplained difficulty in walking or sitting, love bites; Frequent complaints of abdominal pain without any obvious cause;
Torn, stained, or bloody underclothes.

Psychological Abuse

(a) Persecution / Harassment

Incidents including threats of harm or abandonment, verbal or racial abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services or support networks.

(b) Humiliation

Making the vulnerable person feel ashamed of his/her involuntary behaviours, blaming the vulnerable person for attitudes, actions or events beyond their control, ridiculing the

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vulnerable person for his/her conduct, disregarding their presence and/or the request of the vulnerable person. Coercion into activities that are inappropriate e.g. age, gender.

(c) Confinement

Involuntary withdrawal of a person from a valued activity;
Imposing isolation or confinement to the immediate environment e.g. constantly sending people to their bedroom, locking doors;
Confinement of the movement of a person’s body, e.g. Buxton chair, tying to chairs.

(d) Denial of Human Rights

Denial of choice and privacy;
Not allowed to take risks, being overprotected;
Denial of dignity and respect;
Denied involvement in making decisions about self; Deliberate withholding of information on choices and options.

Possible Indicators

The vulnerable adult:
Appears withdrawn, agitated or anxious in general, or intimidated or subdued in the presence of the carer;
May complain of feeling humiliated, depressed or consumed by hopelessness;
May be frightened of making choices or exercising their rights because of threats or bribes; May have a change in their eating pattern resulting in unusual weight gain /loss;
May have sleep problems, either insomnia or the need for excessive sleep;
May be tearful, confused or have an air of resignation.
The carer talks about the vulnerable adult in a dismissive or derogatory manner.

Financial or Material Abuse

Resulting from acts of commission and omission on the part of others including theft. fraud, pressure around wills, property or inheritance, misuse or misappropriation of benefits.

Possible Indicators

Unexplained or sudden inability to pay bills;
Unexplained or sudden withdrawal of money from accounts;
Disparity between assets and satisfactory living conditions;
Reluctance by vulnerable adult / relatives to accept any necessary assistance requiring expenditure when finances are not a problem (NB some people are naturally thrifty); Extraordinary interest by family members and other people in the vulnerable adult’s assets; Missing personal belongings such as art or jewellery.

Neglect

Including failure to access medical care or services, negligence in the face of risk-taking, failure to give prescribed medication, adequate nutrition or failure to provide heating.

Possible Indicators

Dirt, faecal/urine smell, or other health and safely hazards in a person’s living environment; Prolonged loneliness;

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Sense of isolation and depression; Rashes, sores, lice on person;
Person is poorly or inadequately clothed; Person is malnourished or dehydrated; Pressure sores;

Person has an untreated medical condition; Person has withdrawn behaviour;
Over or under medication;
Dishevelled appearance;

Basic needs appear not to be met e.g. person is always hungry, looks emaciated, person is left unattended at home and so put at risk;
Home environment does not meet basic needs e.g. no heating.

B2 Predisposing Factors Which May Lead to Abuse

The following factors may make abuse more likely to occur.

Victim Characteristics

a. Research has indicated that individuals with the following conditions and characteristics are more likely to be abused. Where the vulnerable adult: has communication difficulties; rejects help;
has unusual behavioural traits;

does not consider the needs of the carer and other family members;
is socially isolated;
is dependent on the carer for financial purposes;
is highly dependent on the carer for physical and/or psychological care.

b. If the family:
has poor family relationships or where family violence is the norm;
is under stress due to poor income or housing conditions;
roles have been reversed, where for example, a domineering parent becomes dependent.

c. The stress of caring for a physically and/or mentally frail adult without adequate support can lead to abusive behaviour towards an individual if the carer:
has unwillingly changed their lifestyle;
is not receiving practical and/or emotional support from other family members;

is showing signs of physical or mental illness or becoming dependent on drugs or alcohol; is feeling emotionally and socially isolated, undervalued or stigmatised;
has other responsibilities. e.g. family, work;
has no personal or private space or life outside the caring environment;

has frequently requested help but the problems have not been solved;
is being abused by the vulnerable person;
is reliant on the vulnerable person for financial assistance or has financial difficulties.

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Abuser Characteristics

Some abusers have some form of mental health problem, personality problem, addiction to alcohol or drugs or dependency on the vulnerable person for income, shelter or emotional support. Mistreatment of the vulnerable adult may be more likely where individuals:
lack support and social contact;

lack understanding of the ageing process/illness/disability/need of the vulnerable adult and how to offer adequate care;
have experienced major lifestyle changes which will have affected personal ambitions;
feel emotionally isolated;

have financial problems because of low income or debt problems;
are dependent upon the person they abuse for accommodation, financial or emotional support;
have made frequent requests for help from Health and Social Services without any resolution;
have experienced previous relationship difficulties within the family setting;
have no personal space;
are in a role reversed relationship where for example, domineering parent becomes dependent;
have poor housing conditions;
lack self esteem and feel uncared for;
feel resentment that they are being treated unfairly or feel that they are being victimised; suffer severe stress or are exhausted through lack of sleep and or heavy physical demands; feel exploited by relatives or service providers;
are themselves abused by the vulnerable adult;
demand or need a level of care beyond the capacity of the carer;
feel isolated and lack other relationships which give social, physical and emotional satisfaction and support;
have conflicting responsibilities or financial difficulties.

Employees /Workplace Characteristics

Abuse may be more likely to occur in work place situations where the following factors are prevalent:
low staffing levels over a long period of time;
low staff morale;

inappropriate staff attitude; inadequate staff training and support; high staff turnover;
isolated, few visitors.

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APPENDICES

1. A model Policy on the Safeguarding of Adults in the Church

This statement was adopted by The Point at a meeting on …………

This policy will be reviewed annually by the Board of Trustees and a report given to the Annual General Meeting by the church representative in order that the policy might be monitored.

  1. We recognize that everyone has different levels of vulnerability and that each of us may be regarded as vulnerable at some time in our lives.
  2. As members of this church we commit ourselves to respectful pastoral care for all adults to whom we minister.
  3. We commit ourselves to the safeguarding of people who may be vulnerable, ensuring their well-being in the life of this church.
  4. We commit ourselves to promoting safe practice by those in positions of trust.
  5. The church commits itself to promoting the inclusion and empowerment of peoplewho may be vulnerable.
  6. It is the responsibility of each of us to prevent the physical, verbal, emotional,financial, sexual, institutional and spiritual abuse of vulnerable people and to report

    any such abuse that we discover or suspect.

  7. We undertake to exercise proper care in the appointment and selection of thosewho will work with people who may be vulnerable.
  8. The church is committed to supporting, resourcing, training and regularly reviewingthose who undertake work amongst people who may be vulnerable.
  9. The church adopts the guidelines of the Church of England and the Diocese.
  10. Each person who works with vulnerable people will agree to abide by theserecommendations and the guidelines established by this church.

This church appoints ……………………… to represent the concerns and views of vulnerable people at our meetings and to outside bodies.

Our CRB validator is……………….
Incumbent ……………………………………………………………….. Date ……………………………………………………………………….

2. Parish/network church information and application form for all paid and voluntary workers with vulnerable adults

The post or task for which you are applying will require a disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau at the enhanced level before the position can be confirmed. The possession of a criminal conviction will not necessarily be a bar to taking up the post. All information received during the recruitment process will be carefully assessed for its relevance. The

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Diocese has policies on the recruitment of ex-offenders and on the secure storage of sensitive information. These policies may be obtained from your Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Coordinator

Name ………………………………………………………………………………………

Maiden or former name ……………………………………………………………………

Address …………………………………………………………………………………….

Any previous address in the last 5 years ………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Previous church in the past 5 years ………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Telephone (Home) …………………………….. (Work) ………………………………..
May we telephone you at work if necessary? …………………………………………….. Role applied for …………………………………………………………………………….

Describe any educational qualifications or training courses which are relevant to this position ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Describe any educational qualifications or training courses which are relevant to this position ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Describe any employment, volunteer positions or experience which is relevant to this position
……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Name and address of two referees who know you well, but who are not related to you, one of which can comment on your abilities and attitudes to vulnerable people

Referee 1

Name ……………………………………………………………………………………………

Address ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Referee 2

Name

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………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Address ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

I agree to complete a confidential declaration form and apply for a disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau at the enhanced level [NB: Delete if not required]

Signed ………………………………………………….

Date ……………………………………………………

3. Confidential Declaration with Respect to Work with Vulnerable Adults

To be completed by those wishing to work with children or vulnerable people.

The Confidential Declaration form applies to beneficed clergy, those who hold the bishop’s Licence or permission to officiate, employees, ordinands and volunteers who are likely to be in regular contact with children or vulnerable people. This form is strictly confidential and, except under compulsion of law, will be seen only by those responsible for the appointment and, when appropriate, the diocesan/bishop’s adviser for children and vulnerable people. All forms will be kept securely under the terms of the Data Protection Act 1998. If you answer yes to any question, please give details, on a separate sheet if necessary, giving the number of the question you are answering. 1. Have you ever been convicted of a criminal offence (including any spent convictions under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974)?

YES®NO®

Note: Declare all convictions, cautions, warnings or reprimands however old or whether you are at present under investigation by the police. Motoring offences that cannot be dealt with by a prison sentence need not be declared. Posts where the person is working or coming into regular contact with children or vulnerable adults are exempt from the ‘Rehabilitation Act 1974’. Convictions obtained abroad must be declared as well as those from the UK.

2. Have you ever been cautioned by the police, given a reprimand or warning or bound over to keep the peace?

YES®NO®
3. Are you at present under investigation by the police or an employer for any offence?

YES®NO®

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4. Has your name been placed on the Independent Safeguarding Authority Barred list, barring you from work with children or vulnerable people?

YES®NO®

5. Have you ever been found by a court exercising civil jurisdiction (including matrimonial or family jurisdiction) to have caused significant harm* to a child or vulnerable adult, or has any such court made an order against you on the basis of any finding or allegation that any child or vulnerable adult was at risk of significant harm from you?

YES®NO®
Note: Declare any finding of fact by a civil court that your actions have significantly harmed

a child or vulnerable adult. Declare any court orders made on this basis.

6. Has your conduct ever caused or been likely to cause significant harm to a child or vulnerable adult, or put a child or vulnerable adult at risk of significant harm?

YES®NO®
Note: Make any statement you wish regarding any incident you wish to declare.

7. To your knowledge, has it ever been alleged that your conduct has resulted in any of those things?

YES®NO®

If yes, please give details, including the date(s) and nature of the conduct, or alleged conduct, and whether you were dismissed, disciplined, moved to other work or resigned from any paid or voluntary work as a result.

Note: Declare any complaints or allegations made against you, however long ago, that you have significantly harmed a child, young person or vulnerable adult. Any allegation or complaint investigated by the police, Children’s Services, an employer or voluntary body must be declared. Checks will be made with the relevant authorities.

8. Has a child in your care or for whom you have or had parental responsibility ever been removed from your care, been placed on the Child Protection Register or been the subject of a care order, a supervision order, a child assessment order or an emergency protection order under the Children Act 1989, or a similar order under other legislation?

YES®NO®
Note: All these matters will be checked with the relevant authorities.

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9. Have you any health problem(s), which might affect your work with children or vulnerable adults?

YES®NO®

Note: Declare in confidence any health issues that may affect your ability to work with children or adults. This question is primarily intended to help you if you subsequently need to withdraw from work e.g. because of a recurring health issue.

* Significant harm involves serious ill-treatment of any kind including neglect, physical, emotional or sexual abuse, or impairment of physical or mental health development. It will also include matters such as a sexual relationship with a young person or adult for whom you had pastoral responsibility.

Declaration

I declare that the above information (and that on the attached sheets **) is accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge.

Signed ………………………………………………………………………………..

Full name ……………………………………………………………………………. Date ……………………………………. Date of Birth ……………………………

Address ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. …………….

** Please delete if not applicable. Please return completed form to: ………………………………… Before an appointment can be confirmed applicants may be required to provide an enhanced Disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau and Register with the Independent Safeguarding Authority – see incumbent or church coordinator for details.

All information declared on this form will be carefully assessed to decide whether it is relevant to the post applied for and will only be used for the purpose of safeguarding children, young people or vulnerable adults.

4. Sample of Letter to be sent to referees

Dear
(Name……………) has volunteered to help with vulnerable adults in this church, and has provided your name as a referee who can vouch for his/her suitability to work with vulnerable people.

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I should be grateful if you would complete the questionnaire provided and return it to me at the above address. Any information given will be treated in confidence and disclosed only in order to protect vulnerable people, or to the applicant with your foreknowledge.

I would be happy to discuss this request with you if necessary and please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any queries.

May I take this opportunity of thanking you for your help. Yours sincerely

Vulnerable Adults Coordinator The Point Church

5. Sample reply form for referees Reference questionnaire

Private and confidential (please state if there is anything you write that you do not wish the applicant to see)

Name of Volunteer……………………………………………………………………… Your relationship to the volunteer (please circle)?
Relative Friend Employer
Other (please specify)…………………………………………………………………..

How long have you known the Volunteer?………………………………………………. Is the applicant suitable to work with vulnerable adults? ……………………………………………

From your own knowledge and experience of the applicant, please comment on his/her honesty, reliability, health and experience of working with vulnerable people.

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Are there any reasons which would give you concern about the applicant taking up this role in the church?
……………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

This section is for you to add any other comments as to the applicant’s suitability: ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………

Signed………………………………………………..

Date…………………………………………………

6. SAMPLE Job role for volunteers / workers with

Vulnerable Adults

This form should be completed for all workers with children, young people and vulnerable adults. If the role changes substantially a new form should be completed. Copies should be retained by the

volunteer, the Secretary to the January 2013 and the person to whom the volunteer is responsible.

Name of worker A N Other Job role:

(Example) Church Eucharistic Minister to the Housebound

Job Purpose:
(Example) To bring the Eucharist into the residence of housebound people Person to whom responsible

Main Responsibilities

(Example)

  • ·  To bring the Eucharist from the church to people in the community who are housebound, due to health, age or disability.
  • ·  To follow instruction given by the church for the reverend conveying of the
  • ·  Eucharist and to follow the appropriate format for the administration of the
  • ·  Eucharist
  • ·  When visiting people either in hospital or in a residential home, to respect the policies andregulations of the organisation, particularly by notifying someone in a supervisory position , of your presence in the home
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  • ·  To adhere to Diocesan policy and procedures for the protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults.
  • ·  In order to sign the declaration below you are expected:
  • ·  To attend the Diocesan Training of Eucharistic Ministers which includes safeguarding training
  • ·  To attend any further safeguarding training as is required by the Diocese.Group/Individual to whom responsible: Signed (on behalf of the Board of Trustees)

    To be completed by the worker with vulnerable adults

    I have read the guidelines produced by the church for safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults and understand and accept that it is my duty to safeguard the welfare of children, young people and vulnerable adults.

    Signed Date

    7. Consent form to use of images

    The Point Church

    We would like to take a photograph/make a video or webcam recording of you. These images may appear on the church notice board, in printed material or on our website.

    To comply with Data Protection Act 1998, we need your permission to do this and would ask that you sign and date the form where shown. We will not use the images for any other purpose.

    I hereby give consent to allowing an image of myself to be displayed in (location)……………………………………………………………………………………

    For the period of……………………………………………………………………………
    After which time I understand that it will be (delete as appropriate): Destroyed Returned to me Kept in the church album

    I have read and understood the conditions of use on the back of this form. If there is any change to my decision I will inform (*).

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Name of person to be photographed: ________________________________________________________________

Signature of person being photographed: __________________________________ Print Name: _______________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Conditions of use

  1. This form is valid for (length of time in weeks, months, or years) ………………………………………. from the date of signing. Your consent will automatically expire after this date.
  2. We will not reuse any images after this time.
  3. We will not include details or full names (which means first name andsurname) of any person in an image on our website, on video, or in printed

    publications, without their expressed permission.

  4. We will not include personal email, postal addresses, telephone or faxnumbers.
  5. We may use group images with very general labels.
  6. We will only use images of people who are suitably dressed to reduce the riskof such images being used inappropriately.

8. Useful contact information

Social Services (East Sussex) Contact Social Care Direct on 0345 60 80 191. If you need to discuss your concerns outside normal office hours, you can contact the Emergency Duty Service on 07699 391462. 0345 60 80 191 between 5pm and 9am, Monday to Friday, and all day Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holidays.

Out of hours emergency tel – 07699 391462.

Social Services (West Sussex) Contact the Adult Safeguarding Unit on 01243 777100. If you need to discuss your concerns outside normal office hours, you can contact the Emergency Duty Service on 01903 694422. –

Social Services ( Brighton & Hove)
Contact the Access Team on 01273 295555 Mini-com: 01273 296388
email: accesspoint@brighton-hove.gov.uk
Out of office hours (in an emergency) via the Police

Police

999 in an emergency
County wide (non emergency) local number 08456070999

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Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser

01273 421021

(If your parish is on the border of another county Social Services (Hampshire) 01962 870500
Social Services (Surrey) 08456 009 009

EXTERNAL DOCUMENTS TO SUPPORT THIS POLICY Document Where to access

Sussex Multi Agency Procedures for Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults www.westsussex.gov.uk

INTERNAL DOCUMENTS TO SUPPORT THIS POLICY
Document Where to access
House of Bishops’ Policy – Promoting a Safe Church www.cofe.anglican.org
Diocesan Child Protection Policy, Procedures and Good Practice Document – The Care and Protection of Children and Young People
www.diochi.org.uk

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9. Resources for people who may be vulnerable Action on Elder Abuse
80 8808 8141
http://www.elderabuse.org.uk

Support, helpline and training materials.

Age Concern England

Astral House
1268 London Road
London
SW16 4ER
020 8765 7200 http://www.ageconcern.org.uk

A national organization offering advice and information about issues concerning older people. There are also local groups offering support and advocacy services.

Alzheimer’s Society

Gordon House
10 Greencoat Place
London
SW1P 1PH http://www.alzheimers.org.uk

A national organization, concerned with people who have dementia, with local groups and a web site providing support to families and training.

Help the Aged

207–221 Pentonville Road
London N1 9VZ
Tel. 020 7278 1114
http://www.helptheaged.org.uk
A national organization offering advice and advocacy.

MENCAP (Royal Mencap Society) 123 Golden Lane
London
EC1Y 0RT http://www.mencap.org.uk

A national organization providing services for people with learning disabilities. They also provide local groups and a web site offering support and social activities to families, adults and children.

MIND (The national association for Mental Health) 15–19 Broadway
London E15 4BQ
Tel. 020 8519 2122

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http://www.mind.org.uk

A national organization, web site and local groups offering support to families and sometimes direct services.

RNIB

(Royal National Institute for the Blind)

105 Judd Street
London
WC1H 9NE
http://www.rnib.org.uk
A national organization focusing on the needs of blind and partially sighted people. They offer advice, aids and equipment.

RNID

(Royal National Institute for Deaf People)

19–23 Featherstone Street London
EC1Y 8SL http://www.rnid.org.uk

A national organization raising awareness of deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus. They also train and provide interpreters.

Scope

PO Box 833
Milton Keynes
MK12 5NY
htpp://www.scope.org.uk
The main national organization for those with cerebral palsy, offering advice and information

which can also be helpful for those with other physical disabilities.

The Shaftesbury Society

16 Kinston Road
London SW19 1JZ
http://www.shaftesburysociety.org.uk
An interdenominational body working with disabled people to help achieve social inclusion, empowerment and justice.

Through the Roof

PO Box 353
Epsom
Surrey KT18 5WS http://www.throughtheroof.org

A Christian body aiming to equip and train churches to include disabled people, by encouraging and equipping them for church leadership; providing support and fellowship to

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disabled people. This is the contact point for the Churches for All consortium – a campaign to encourage churches to provide greater access for disabled people.

Women’s Aid

24 – National Helpline:
Tel 0845 7023468 http://www.womensaid.org.uk

Respond

3rd Flour
24-32 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD
http://www.respond.org.uk
Support for those with learning difficulties who have been abused.

Survivors UK

2 Leathermarket Street London SE1 3HN http://www.survivors.org.uk Support for male survivors

NAPAC

Tel: 0800 085 3330
http://www.napac.org.uk
Telephone helpline for adults abused as children.

Minister and clergy sexual abuse survivors (MACSAS) PO Box 46933
London E8 1XA
Support for people sexually abused by those in ministry

Christian Survivors of Sexual Abuse (CSSA) c/o 38 Sydenham Villa Road
Cheltenham Glos. GL52 6DZ
Support, self-help groups, retreats, worship.

S:Vox

c/o St James Church
236 Mitcham Lane
London SW16 6NT
http://www.svix.org.uk
Support and self-help for survivors of all kinds of abuse.